History, the way it should be taught

well, i'm 1 of those yang suka duduk paling belakang sekali dalam kelas, and when it comes to history class, i was at the back drawing the teacher's face. Yeah, i hate history back then. I do not understand the significant of it. I love World History though, not Sejarah Malaysia. Maybe it's the teacher or maybe it's the syllabus. I don't know. I find it really boring. But now, i realize how rich our history is and i'm keen on reading it because i want to understand the scenario and the reason behind the things that happened today, the WHY. Maybe this article explained it better :

History, the way it should be taught

Point of View: By TUN HANIF OMAR

IT is often said that those who ignore history may keep on making the same mistakes. I am a believer in that and I see mistakes being repeated again and again by people and leaders of all hues. The bigger the leaders, the more consequential their decisions and the greater the pain we bear for their mistakes. That’s why I feel consoled when I see proponents of history from time to time appearing in the media extolling the virtue of history as a compulsory school subject.

Many students in school hate their history classes: that’s a fact but this is because their teachers are not able to convince them how relevant and important are aspects of the subject to their lives. They are also not able to teach them with an interesting approach.

But it’s not always the teachers’ fault: often it is that the curricula or topics predetermined by the ministry are too wide or too vague in their relevance or there is an unrealistic dichotomy between the ministry’s objectives on the one hand and those of the examination question-setters’.

As a general rule, many students think that it’s torturous to remember dates, dates, dates, and names, names, names. Nothing can be more trying than that for those who have yet to see or be shown the significance of those dates and names!

As a nascent nation with a truly multi-racial, multi-cultural, multi-creed and polyglot society, with more natural reasons for breaking up than for uniting, our history curricula and lessons should be carefully tailored to the crucial needs to bring our races to an understanding of and respect for our diversities, our different original circumstances and the wherefores of our constitutional arrangements and their differing provisions in parts for different groups.

Why do we have special positions for the Malay rulers, Malays, for Islam, for Bahasa Melayu, for bumiputras and for East Malaysia? These are crucial questions for all to understand and accept, particularly our young.

Read more here. Source : thestar

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